Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like
Who I Follow

imbloglio:

super-highschool-level-homestuck:

iprayforangels:

plushestrumpest:

30secondstocalifornia:

wingscanspeak:

zorobro:

wingscannotspeak:

peetasboxers:

kissyourneck-slitmythroat:

I showed this post to my boyfriend and he tried to take his shirt off like a girl and 

uh

yeah

Out of the 82k notes my post got this is by far the best comment holy shit thank u for being u

So i tried it both ways and uh

i mean how do you do the first one without pulling out all your hair?

this made me laugh really hard….

and it made me realize that girls and boys pull their shirt off differently. /amazed

but seriously I think girls just do the cross arm thing because of HAIR like demonstrated 

So one year, one URL change, and a hair cut later, I decide to try again… FOR SCIENCE! 

Its not science unless you write it down so 

First method:

image
Well done, i guess…

Second:

image
I fucked up

Girls… how?

I DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW WE CAN HAVE SUCH DIFFERENT WAYS OF TAKING OFF SHIRTS AND SO MUCH DIFFICULTY DOING IT THE OTHER WAY

I FIGURED IT OUT!!!!!

It’s all in the way that girl/boys shirts are made.

Girls shirts have less armpit room then boy’s do and are generally shorter so pulling it off over your head is more practical because by lifting your arms all the way up you make enough room for the sleeves to just slip off.

Boys shirts have more room and are generally longer so it is easy to slip them off over your head.

but if you take a girls shirt off like a boys shirt you will get your arms caught because there isn’t much armpit space.

and if you take a boys shirt off like a girls shit you will still have your head in it when you’ve lifted your arms all the way up because of the shirt’s length.

It has nothing to do with us. It is entirely to do with how our shirts are made. I figured it out for you. YOU’RE WELCOME!

bless you

I just appreciate the thorough peer-reviewed research that went into this.

Tumblr science!

(via arabidopsis)

artoftabby:

iateallofthecake:

This is a huge bat compilation in case you’re having a rough day. I hope this cheers y’all up.

Look at the adorable second picture by the way. *squeals*

For the boyf. Again. BC I know he’s had a rough few weeks, and bats always make him smile.

Bats! :D

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

rifa:

the nOISES I MADE

RATTIE SNUGGLES!!!!

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

buzzfeed:

The former South African president died today at age 95. Remember him through his uplifting and revolutionary words.

(via upworthy)

This evening I had a very pleasant time with Holly, which began with her mentioning how much she liked the song “Across the Universe” and me playing her the version of the song by Laibach, which has always been my favourite. “Dad,” she said, happily, “This was the version of the song I knew as a little girl. You used to play it. I always wondered why the Beatles one sounded different from the way I expected. I mean you could understand the words for a start.” Then we sat in front of the computer for a few hours and I made her a playlist of more songs she had loved as a small girl, the ones she’d remembered and the ones she’d forgotten, which led to our having The Conversation. You know, the one I’ve known was coming for the last almost-nineteen years.

I dragged songs from her childhood over to the playlist — “Barcelona” and “Nothing Compares 2 U” and “I Don’t Like Mondays” and “These Foolish Things” and then came Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side”. “You named me from this song, didn’t you?” said Holly as the first bass notes sang. “Yup,” I said.

Lou started singing.

Holly listened to the first verse, and for the first time, actually heard the words.

"Shaved her legs and then he was a she…? He?"

"That’s right," I said, and bit the bullet. We were having The Conversation. "You were named after a drag queen in a Lou Reed song."

She grinned like a light going on. “Oh dad. I do love you,” she said. Then she picked up an envelope and wrote what I’d just said down on the back, in case she forgot it.

I’m not sure that I’d ever expected The Conversation to go quite like that.

- http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2004/05/in-which-author-finally-has.asp (and Holly, nine years later an out queer milliner, is to be found at http://hollyherself.tumblr.com/)

Last night I held my father’s hand while he dozed in the car next to me, tired and sad about Lou Reed’s death.  A few silent tears fell onto my cheeks, not so much for Lou but more for my dad and his sorrow.  I know Lou Reed meant so much to him he named his daughter after a line in one of his songs. 

I’m so proud to be named for this song.  It’s always been a part of me.  When I was little I loved doing the “do do do do do”s. When I was 19 and just coming out for the first time realising my namesake was non-heteronormative meant so much to me, it made vocalising my sexuality feel infinitely safer. Now I’m so proud to be queer, and an important part of that for me is striving to be an ally to the trans* community.  Thank you, dad, and thank you, Lou, for making that something as intrinsically part of me as my name.  

(via hollyherself)

Ah. So much love…

(via neil-gaiman)

(via neil-gaiman)

veggielezzyfemmie:

fuckyeahsassylucifer:

ultimagus:

buzzfeed:

The only way to respond when someone asks you “why do you write strong female characters.”

The last one.

Congratulations!!! You figured it out!!! Women ARE people!!! *throws confetti in your face*

(via upworthy)

thebluemeany:

50 days of Doctor Who Challenge October 24: Name someone who you think is secretly from the Whoniverse.

David Attenborough = Chameleon Arched Timelord

1. Cares for all lifeforms

2, Travels a lot

3, Wears Converses even in 1954

This makes so much sense!

(via doctorwho)

(via upworthy)

I know they drink blood, but this is adorable! Hop hop!

thatscienceguy:

The Vampire Bat is the only species of bat that has retained its ability to maneuver on land, not only can they walk on land but they can also hop and run at surprisingly fast speeds!

(via howstuffworks)

scienceyoucanlove:

#15. Chimeras! 

Chimeras: Two People in One Body, Not Just Science Fiction Anymore

History is littered with legends and folklore of Chimeras, a mysterious creature that is half human and half beast. According to the ancient Greeks, a Chimera was a fire breathing creature with a head of a lion and the tail of a serpent. The Centaur, a strange creature with the body of a horse and the head, arms, and chest of a man was believed to be the follower of Dionysus.

Urban legends of beasts that are half human and half animal abound. Science fiction writers and the gaming industry sport mysterious beasts, usually with the intellect of humans and various features of some known animal.

But these bizarre humanoid creatures only exist in the imagination of humans, don’t they? Perhaps not.

Human Chimeras do exist, just not in the way they have been portrayed throughout history. A human Chimera, in simple terms, exists when one human being possesses the genetic make up of two separate and distinct individuals.

The concept of human Chimeras was brought to light when Jane, 52 year old woman, underwent routine testing for a possible kidney transplant. The tests were conducted on her, her husband, and her three grown children.

The test results shocked and astounded her. The tests revealed that two of her three children were the offspring of her husband, but were not her biological children. A first, there was speculation that her children had been switched at birth but the odds of two children at two separate times being accidentally switched at birth we too high. There must be another answer.

A team of experts worked diligently for two years before the riddle was solved. By testing the cells of various tissues, experts finally concluded that Jane was a human Chimera. Her body contained the genetic makeup of two distinct human beings.

Experts were aware of a condition called blood Chimeras where fraternal twins are genetically unique, but may share two distinct blood types. This occurs prior to birth when blood forming tissue is somehow exchanged between the twins. It is estimated that 8% of fraternal twins are actually blood Chimeras.

But Jane didn’t have a twin — that she knew of. Jane did; however, begin her life as a fraternal twin. The two embryos merged in utero leaving only one fetus. The genes in Jane’s body are a mosaic of genes from both of the original embryos. Her cheek cells contain the genes of one embryo and her ovary cells contain the genes of another.

Jane brought the condition to light, but she is not an isolated case. In 1998 a patient was referred to the doctors at the University of Edingburg. The patient presented with an undescended testicle. Upon examination, doctors were unable to find the second testicle. What they did find was an ovary and a fallopian tube. The patient was a human Chimera created from the fusion of a male and female embryo.

Not all Chimeras are this dramatic. Most have more subtle signs that they may be a Chimera. Common indicators are eyes of two different colors or patches of hair that are a different color or multicolored hair. Although rare, approximately 30 cases of Chimeras have been documented world wide. It is likely that many more cases exist.

Most of us will never know if we are a Chimera, unless we, like Jane, happen upon an occasion to seek genetic testing and are handed a verdict that can not be explained. Only then may we know for sure that another human being lurks inside of us.

So the next time you look in the mirror and you catch a glimpse that resembles someone else, don’t be alarmed. It just might be your long lost twin that coexists within you.

source 

read more about chimeras 

read more about Venus, the two-faced cat

(via howstuffworks)